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but one couldn't leave the magnificence of Thunder Cape - cloud capped and 1200 feet high - gulls circling and the still great forest - full of dear and moose and other wild few things. It was most impressive - more so perhaps for the veil of rain and cap of clouds which prevented any adequate picture. I watched the gulls a long time in the wake - and read - and helped Laura finish up her box of candy - but it got rougher and wilder as we got further into the open and almost everyone had gone to bed. The man at the dining room door actually made heroines of us when we went in to dinner! (But before that we took naps - to keep warm) At sunset we took a long long walk- round and 'round (it's 250 steps the shortest way.) The sun was lurid and arctic. One could imagine ice and seals and polar bears - there were banks of mist hanging over the cold water. It was magnificent but - well - not pleasant. One must live without one's winter clothes. At dark we went below and wrote letters (or Laura talked to the steward-man) and then packed and went to bed. We had a nice stateroom, but blankets are somewhat scarce!


but one couldn't leave the magnificence of Thunder Cape - cloud capped and 1200 feet high - gulls circling and the still great forest - full of dear and moose and other wild few things. It was most impressive - more so perhaps for the veil of rain and cap of clouds which prevented any adequate picture. I watched the gulls a long time in the wake - and read - and helped Laura finish up her box of candy - but it got rougher and wilder as we got further into the open and almost everyone had gone to bed. The man at the dining room door actually made heroines of us when we went in to dinner! (But before that we took naps - to keep warm) At sunset we took a long long walk- round and 'round (it's 250 steps the shortest way.) The sun was lurid and arctic. One could imagine ice and seals and polar bears - there were banks of mist hanging over the cold water. It was magnificent but - well - not pleasant. One must live without one's winter clothes. At dark we went below and wrote letters (or Laura talked to the steward-man) and then packed and went to bed. We had a nice stateroom, but blankets are somewhat scarce!


but one couldn't leave the magnificence of Thunder Cape - cloud capped and 1200 feet high - gulls circling and the still great forest - full of dear and moose and other wild few things. It was most impressive - more so perhaps for the veil of rain and cap of clouds which prevented any adequate picture. I watched the gulls a long time in the wake - and read - and helped Laura finish up her box of candy - but it got rougher and wilder as we got further into the open and almost everyone had gone to bed. The man at the dining room door actually made heroines of us when we went in to dinner! (But before that we took naps - to keep warm) At sunset we took a long long walk- round and 'round (it's 250 steps the shortest way.) The sun was lurid and arctic. One could imagine ice and seals and polar bears - there were banks of mist hanging over the cold water. It was magnificent but - well - not pleasant. One must live without one's winter clothes. At dark we went below and wrote letters (or Laura talked to the steward-man) and then packed and went to bed. We had a nice stateroom, but blankets are somewhat scarce!

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