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7/28/04
for a few dollars for seven million! Mr. Mace was very nice and we had quite a jolly time - for it didn't really rain. Stopped at a spring, going down. Also took a few pictures and picked buttercups. When we got to the lower levels of Hancock - down in the docks - we went into the smelting places and learned to make ingots, a most interesting and most beautiful process. The pouring of the lurid melted copper is a gorgeous process - the coloring is so go wonderful lurid greens and gold & red. Then the man who wipes out the mould with grease leads a lively life - for the grease is constantly catching fire and chasing him. Then the other men turn the hot mounds of copper into running water, when they are "done" just right (about a minute and a half) and another man hauls them out when they are dry, and piles them up. They weigh about 40 52 pounds - the size we saw them make. When the big ladles get caked they cool them poured off the copper which adheres and paint them with clay. The interior of the furnaces are like the pictures in the old- fashioned Bibles of Shadrock & the rest - very awful! We got over to the boat finally, stopping for a rather interesting conversation with a "souvenir boy" - who said one of his friends sold $31.00 worth on the yacht that morning!

7/28/04
for a few dollars for seven million! Mr. Mace was very nice and we had quite a jolly time - for it didn't really rain. Stopped at a spring, going down. Also took a few pictures and picked buttercups. When we got to the lower levels of Hancock - down in the docks - we went into the smelting places and learned to make ingots, a most interesting and most beautiful process. The pouring of the lurid melted copper is a gorgeous process - the coloring is so go wonderful lurid greens and gold & red. Then the man who wipes out the mould with grease leads a lively life - for the grease is constantly catching fire and chasing him. Then the other men turn the hot mounds of copper into running water, when they are "done" just right (about a minute and a half) and another man hauls them out when they are dry, and piles them up. They weigh about 40 52 pounds - the size we saw them make. When the big ladles get caked they cool them poured off the copper which adheres and paint them with clay. The interior of the furnaces are like the pictures in the old- fashioned Bibles of Shadrock & the rest - very awful! We got over to the boat finally, stopping for a rather interesting conversation with a "souvenir boy" - who said one of his friends sold $31.00 worth on the yacht that morning!

7/28/04
for a few dollars for seven million! Mr. Mace was very nice and we had quite a jolly time - for it didn't really rain. Stopped at a spring, going down. Also took a few pictures and picked buttercups. When we got to the lower levels of Hancock - down in the docks - we went into the smelting places and learned to make ingots, a most interesting and most beautiful process. The pouring of the lurid melted copper is a gorgeous process - the coloring is so go wonderful lurid greens and gold & red. Then the man who wipes out the mould with grease leads a lively life - for the grease is constantly catching fire and chasing him. Then the other men turn the hot mounds of copper into running water, when they are "done" just right (about a minute and a half) and another man hauls them out when they are dry, and piles them up. They weigh about 40 52 pounds - the size we saw them make. When the big ladles get caked they cool them poured off the copper which adheres and paint them with clay. The interior of the furnaces are like the pictures in the old- fashioned Bibles of Shadrock & the rest - very awful! We got over to the boat finally, stopping for a rather interesting conversation with a "souvenir boy" - who said one of his friends sold $31.00 worth on the yacht that morning!
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