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Went up on deck and Capt. Doherty was quite interesting as we went in the Estuary toward Hancock and Houghton. He pointed out the school of Mines, the mine in sight &c. &c. We passed a pretty little private yacht "The Path Finder". Morgan's - from Chicago, I think. Capt showed me the long hill up to the Quincy mine - but advised me not to climb it - so when we got to Hougton we decided we would. Laura Mr. Mace, the Foster's, Mrs. Morrow and I all started forth together - crossed the bridge to Hancock and started toward the hill, when the Foster's and Mrs. M.

backed out & went back to see the smelters. We three kept on - up past the Opera House (where "Fala Lafollette & a stock co. were playing!) and up and up and up. The view improving and our wind now and then giving out for it was pretty stiff. It also threatened rain - but we reached the top - inquired, explored, looked at ore &c. Went into the oldest shaft house of all - where the "hole" is over 5400 ft. deep - and saw the cars rushing down a mile into the earth. It was rather awful. An old miner told us he had worked there 42 years - 15 underground - and liked that part the best. This is a very rich mine. The first discovered on the peninsula (by a man hunting wood chucks) and was sold by the man who bought the land.


Went up on deck and Capt. Doherty was quite interesting as we went in the Estuary toward Hancock and Houghton. He pointed out the school of Mines, the mine in sight &c. &c. We passed a pretty little private yacht "The Path Finder". Morgan's - from Chicago, I think. Capt showed me the long hill up to the Quincy mine - but advised me not to climb it - so when we got to Hougton we decided we would. Laura Mr. Mace, the Foster's, Mrs. Morrow and I all started forth together - crossed the bridge to Hancock and started toward the hill, when the Foster's and Mrs. M.

backed out & went back to see the smelters. We three kept on - up past the Opera House (where "Fala Lafollette & a stock co. were playing!) and up and up and up. The view improving and our wind now and then giving out for it was pretty stiff. It also threatened rain - but we reached the top - inquired, explored, looked at ore &c. Went into the oldest shaft house of all - where the "hole" is over 5400 ft. deep - and saw the cars rushing down a mile into the earth. It was rather awful. An old miner told us he had worked there 42 years - 15 underground - and liked that part the best. This is a very rich mine. The first discovered on the peninsula (by a man hunting wood chucks) and was sold by the man who bought the land.


Went up on deck and Capt. Doherty was quite interesting as we went in the Estuary toward Hancock and Houghton. He pointed out the school of Mines, the mine in sight &c. &c. We passed a pretty little private yacht "The Path Finder". Morgan's - from Chicago, I think. Capt showed me the long hill up to the Quincy mine - but advised me not to climb it - so when we got to Hougton we decided we would. Laura Mr. Mace, the Foster's, Mrs. Morrow and I all started forth together - crossed the bridge to Hancock and started toward the hill, when the Foster's and Mrs. M.

backed out & went back to see the smelters. We three kept on - up past the Opera House (where "Fala Lafollette & a stock co. were playing!) and up and up and up. The view improving and our wind now and then giving out for it was pretty stiff. It also threatened rain - but we reached the top - inquired, explored, looked at ore &c. Went into the oldest shaft house of all - where the "hole" is over 5400 ft. deep - and saw the cars rushing down a mile into the earth. It was rather awful. An old miner told us he had worked there 42 years - 15 underground - and liked that part the best. This is a very rich mine. The first discovered on the peninsula (by a man hunting wood chucks) and was sold by the man who bought the land.

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